Sunday, November 20, 2005

Complications of Cellulitis

There are many complications that can arise from cellulitis, even treated episodes. These complications can include sepsis, septicemia, bacteremia, and gangrene.

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Sepsis

Sepsis is a life threatening infection wherein the bloodstream has been invaded by bacteria. As a result the bacteria spreads rapidly throughout the body. Untreated sepsis or late treated sepsis will result in septicemia and death.Determination of sepsis and identification of the bacterium is done through blood cultures.

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Sepsis

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Sepsis B

Bill Harrison, MD

Sepsis is a severe infection in the body and bloodstream that can lead to shock, a reaction caused by lack of blood flow in the body

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WHAT IS SEPSIS?

Sepsis can be defined as the body’s response to an infection. An infection is caused by microorganisms or "germs" (usually bacteria) invading the body, and can be limited to a particular body region (e.g., a tooth abscess) or can be widespread in the bloodstream (often called "septicemia" or "blood poisoning").

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Sepsis Pathophysiology and Treatment

Medscape/WebMD

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Septicemia

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Septicemia Images

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Septicemia

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Septicemia

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Septicemia

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Septic shock

Septic shock is a form of physiological shock resulting from septicemia (bacteria in the blood). Fever, rapid heart beat, fast breathing and confusion may also occur. Septic shock generally follows the same sign of severe infection and blood culture are critical to the correct diagnosis and treatment. Untreated or incorrectly treated septic shock can result in death.

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Shock, Septic

Last Updated: July 25, 2002Synonyms and related keywords: bacteremia, sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndromeAuthor: J Stephan Stapczynski, MD, Chair, Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center

http://www.emedicine.com/EMERG/topic533.htm

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Septic shock

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Optimal management of septic shock

Stephen J. Fitch, MD; James R. Gossage, MDVOL 111 / NO 3 / MARCH 2002 / POSTGRADUATE MEDICINE

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Treating Septic shockPatrick Neligan - University of Pennsylvania

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Septic shock

By Adam Brochert, MD

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Bacteremia

Simply defined as the presence of bacteria in the blood. Bacteremia is diagnosed by rowing organism from a blood sample and is treated with antibiotics. See also septicemia

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Bacteremia

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Bactermia

Last Updated: January 24, 2003Synonyms and related keywords: bacteriemia, fever, fever without a source, FWS, occult bacteremia, bloodstream infection, serious bacterial infection, SBIAuthor: Brian J Holland, MD, Staff Physician, Department of Pediatrics, Tripler Army Medical Center

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Bacteremia

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Quality Standard for the Treatment of Bacteremia

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Gangrene

Gangrene is a serious possible complication from infections that can result in either loss of limb or life. It is the necrosis or death of tissue as a result of loss of blood supply or bacterial invasion.While gangrene most often involves the limbs, it can occur anywherethat an extensive infection has taken place.It can have a foul or offensive odor, spread rapidly, and may result in death in a few days. In all types of gangrene, surgery is required to remove the dead tissue.

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Dry Gangrene

Dry gangrene is a problem associated with diabetes mellitus that has lead to a thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries (arteriosclerosis) in which the affected limb becomes cold, dry, shriveled and may eventually turn black.

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Moist Gangrene

Moist gangrene may follow a crushing or traumatic injury wherein there is a blockage of blood flow by a clot, embolism, tight bandages or tourniquet.

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Gangrene

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Lymphedema People

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